Rain City Ambience

Seattle-based Northwest music source established in 2005
  • Tag Archive: album review

    1. Album Reviews : Turnover – Peripheral Vision

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      Read Joe’s review of Turnover’s Peripheral Vision and let us know what you think of this cool new record!


    2. Album Reviews : The Scenic Route – Moments

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      This self proclaimed “whatever” rock band from Seattle released their EP for the world to listen to… FOR FREE. So, I had to take the opportunity to listen and review. Basically, its a throwback without the weird haircut.


    3. Album Reviews : Lo’ There Do I See My Brother – Northern Shore

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      Pacific Northwest musicians have been telling me for ages to listen to Lo’ There Do I See My Brother, but it wasn’t until a copy of the much-anticipated Northern Shore dropped into my inbox that I had a chance to actually listen.


    4. Album Reviews : Front Porch Step – Whole Again EP

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      After a meteoric rise in 2013, Ohio singer Jake Mcelfresh, better known as Front Porch Step, is serving up a new 7″ EP titled Whole Again. The prolific Pure Noise artist just wrapped up a national run with the Pure Noise Tour, and is losing no time putting out this December 2nd release.


    5. Album Review : Anberlin – Lowborn

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      On Anberlin’s breakout 2008 major label debut, New Surrender, frontman Stephen Christian passionately sang that he wanted to “burn out brighter, brighter than the Northern lights.” Flash forward to 2014, and after 11 years of musical output, Anberlin has decided that it’s better to burn out bright than to fade away. To that end, the Florida quintet will be disbanding at the year’s end and has offered us its seventh and final album, entitled Lowborn, as a bittersweet parting gift. The album captures Anberlin in its purest form, beholden to neither fan nor label expectations, and the results are as polarizing as they are marvelous.


    6. Album Review : My Goodness – Shiver + Shake

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      My Goodness, a two piece alt-blues rock outfit, makes sure their approach is never predictable with Shiver + Shake.


    7. Album Review : Easy Victim, Charitable Deceptions – W. C. Lindsay

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      William Charles ‘W. C.’ Lindsay. Remember this name. Fresh off his Tax Day release of ‘Easy Victim, Charitable Deceptions’, this young Philly transplant is a solo-ish artist whose style is impossible to describe, but entirely easy to enjoy. Grown out of electronic and rock roots, W. C. Lindsay jumps genres with ease, naturally progressing through rock and pop punk into hip hop and electronic in this 12-song release. The album is available for purchase on Bandcamp, and $1 of each purchase will go to Big Brothers, Big Sisters!


    8. Album Review : Black Sheep EP – The Home Team

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      It’s always a good time scoping the diverse talent present in Seattle, and local quintet The Home Team is the latest in a string of great bands we’ve had the honor of reviewing! Led by vocalist Jairod Collins and filled out by guitarists John Baran and Nick Alzate, bassist Alex Larson and drummer Daniel Matson, this experienced outfit’s new EP ‘Black Sheep’ is a promising 5-track that joins the intensity of throwback pop punk with an updated, modern sound.


    9. Album Review : Reflektor – Arcade Fire

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      If you have ever wanted or needed an album with more than one six plus minute song, this album is for you. Arcade Fire’s “Reflektor” not only captives the lost concept of an album as an art form rather than a grouping of singles, but it joins this seemingly perfect union between the real and unreal with popping synth and echoing lyrics. It’s a surprisingly twisted fantasy wrapped into two six track albums in one. Confused yet?


    10. Album Review : Sworn In – The Death Card

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      After one listen to Sworn In’s debut album “The Death Card”, many questions begin to surface. As the idea of death being an escape to the feeling of losing something close to you, like your sanity, with each listen to the album, the listener will begin to question just how strong their sanity is, at least that’s how I felt. With each track telling a new disturbing and mind twisting tale, “The Death Card” is story of a man who begins to question his choices in life and if he really is losing everything around him or just slowly letting his sanity slip further and further from his grasp to bring him back to reality. With each track painting a picture of man at the end of his rope and with his mental wellbeing at stake, “The Death Card” is a non-stop, relentless and chest pounding attack upon the listener.